Nanostructured silicon delivers unprecedented optical devices

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1117/2.1201702.006825
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TypeArticle
Journal titleSPIE Newsroom
ISSN1818-2259
AbstractOn-chip optical and photonic devices are key to major advances in fields as diverse as optical communications, sensing, and quantum physics. These integrated devices enable complex optical functionalities on a single chip (i.e., within a few square millimeters) that might otherwise occupy an entire optical table when implemented with bulk optical components. Currently, many commercial photonic chips are made from group III–V materials (i.e., containing elements in groups 13 and 15 of the periodic table), such as indium phosphide. Over the past decade, integrated photonic systems based on group IV materials—elements in group 14, particularly silicon and germanium—have drawn a lot of attention and are being developed by research groups around the world as well as industrial players, such as IBM and Intel. The main advantage of silicon photonics is that the CMOS infrastructure of the micro-electronics industry can be leveraged, potentially leading to high-volume and low-cost fabrication. However, in terms of performance and optical bandwidth—the range of optical wavelengths (colors) that a device can process accurately—many integrated photonic devices cannot yet compete with their bulk-optics counterparts. Here, we present a new silicon optical waveguide device that offers high performance and ultra-broad bandwidth operation with a very compact footprint.
Publication date
PublisherSPIE
LanguageEnglish
Export citationExport as RIS
CollectionGateway to Research Data
Record identifier51fb0244-5068-474b-aaf7-4b000505bc89
Record created2017-10-13
Record modified2017-10-13
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